Rogue Planet, Dangerous Dance, SpaceX & Electric Propulsion


This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image features two interacting galaxies that are so intertwined, they have a collective name – Arp 91. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, J. Dalcanton, Acknowledgement: J. Schmidt

Hubble Detects a Dangerous Dance

This International Space Station Expedition 65 Crew

The seven-member Expedition 65 crew gathered for a portrait inside the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

Smile! You’re on the International Space Station

On October 4, 2021, the seven-member Expedition 65 crew gathered for a portrait inside the vestibule in between the International Space Station’s Unity module and Tranquility module. In the front row from left are; Commander Thomas Pesquet of the European Space Agency; and NASA astronauts Megan McArthur and Shane Kimbrough. In the back are: Roscosmos cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy; astronaut Akihiko Hoshide of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency; NASA astronaut Mark Vande Hei; and Roscosmos cosmonaut Pyotr Dubrov.

Jupiter-Like Rogue Planet

This artist’s conception illustrates a Jupiter-like planet alone in the dark of space, floating freely without a parent star. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

A Jupiter-Like Rogue Planet Wanders Alone in Space

This artist’s conception illustrates a Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope will conduct a survey to discover many more exoplanets using powerful techniques available to a wide-field telescope. 

SpaceX Cargo Dragon Resupply Ship Departure

SpaceX Cargo Dragon resupply ship is pictured as it backs away from the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

A Colorful Departure From the Space Station

In this image from September 30, 2021, the International Space Station’s forward-facing international docking adapter. The Cargo Dragon’s beacon lights and a plume from one of its engines during its departure burn made for a colorful show.

Electric Hall Thruster NASA Psyche Spacecraft

At left, xenon plasma emits a blue glow from an electric Hall thruster identical to those that will propel NASA’s Psyche spacecraft to the main asteroid belt. On the right is a similar non-operating thruster. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Psyche Mission to an Asteroid: Electric Propulsion Comes of Age

When it comes time for NASA’s Psyche spacecraft to power itself through deep space, it’ll be more brain than brawn that does the work. Once the stuff of science fiction, the efficient and quiet power of electric propulsion will provide the force that propels the Psyche spacecraft all the way to the main asteroid belt between metal-rich asteroid also called Psyche.

The photo on the left captures an operating electric Hall thruster identical to those that will propel NASA’s Psyche spacecraft, which is set to launch in August 2022 and travel to the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. The xenon ADVERTISEMENT



Source link : https://news.google.com/__i/rss/rd/articles/CBMiaWh0dHBzOi8vc2NpdGVjaGRhaWx5LmNvbS9uYXNhLWltYWdlcy1vZi10aGUtd2Vlay1yb2d1ZS1wbGFuZXQtZGFuZ2Vyb3VzLWRhbmNlLXNwYWNleC1lbGVjdHJpYy1wcm9wdWxzaW9uL9IBbWh0dHBzOi8vc2NpdGVjaGRhaWx5LmNvbS9uYXNhLWltYWdlcy1vZi10aGUtd2Vlay1yb2d1ZS1wbGFuZXQtZGFuZ2Vyb3VzLWRhbmNlLXNwYWNleC1lbGVjdHJpYy1wcm9wdWxzaW9uL2FtcC8?oc=5

Author :

Publish date : 2021-10-10 22:44:46

Tags:
share on: